Gay Mafia snuffs out another enemy of the family

Gay-mafia2When Indiana passed the Religious Freedom Restoration Act–a law protecting religious freedom–the Gay Mafia objected. As a result, the Republican cowards in the Hoosier State reversed themselves, granting special rights to the homosexual community and criminalizing Christians and other people of faith who choose to exercise their Constitutional right.

The fallout from these extortion tactics have since led to other states caving to the homosexual mob, and have emboldened some pro-homosexual politicians at the state level–because every mob owns a politician or two–to call for Nazi-styled branding of businesses who choose to exercise their rights. Even the politicians working for them in Washington have joined the mob in calls for voiding the religious rights of those who object to the homosexual movement and the Gay Mafia.

Interestingly enough, it has also led to a bizarro-world type of situation, where businesses are discriminating against Christians who are suffering the negative consequences of allegedly discriminating against homosexuals.

Well, they have struck again, this time in Grimes, Iowa, where the owners of a Christian family run business is being forced to shut their doors after being charged with discrimination against a homosexual couple.

Betty Odgaard and her husband, Richard, have been the owners of Görtz Haus Gallery since 2002, when they purchased a 77-year-old stone church and transformed it into a bistro, flower shop, art gallery and wedding venue. On August 3, 2013, a homosexual couple from Des Moines asked to rent Görtz Haus for their wedding, and because of their Mennonite faith, the Odgaards told the couple they couldn’t host their wedding.

The couple immediately filed a discrimination complaint through the Iowa Civil Rights Commission, and knowing their business was going to be in trouble, the Odgaards ended their wedding business in order to avoid the probability of another complaint and the associated fines and penalties. After leaving the wedding business, Görtz Haus struggled to survive, but the Odgaards felt they had not choice. The risks were simply too great.

This case was the first of its kind in Iowa, but it didn’t get the same media hype as the Oregon bakers, the New Mexico photographers, or the New York farmers. Due to pending litigation at the time with their case, the Odgaards were prevented from making their situation known. And while never admitting any discrimination, they settled with the homosexual extortionists for $5000 — a small victory of sorts considering the fact that the Gay Mafia originally demanded $10,000.

In the end, it still serves as a loss to freedom and a win for the politically-correct. And, it sets a precedent that pretty much ensures it will happen again and again all across the country. To quote Richard Odgaard:

“Now the precedent has been set. The administrative process has demonstrated what it will do if this happens (again), so it’s a matter of setting somebody up and collecting money. It’s that simple (and) it’s all they have to do.”

In other words, the Gay Mafia isn’t finished with taking out the enemies of the family.